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5 womxn in the war against climate change

5 womxn in the war against climate change

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Good news – womxn are incredible! In fact, womxn are one of the best resources we have in the war against climate change.

Good news – womxn are incredible! In fact, womxn are one of the best resources we have in the war against climate change.

5 womxn in the war against climate change
Let’s get the bad news out of the way – climate change is very much real and happening, and it’s disproportionately affecting womxn – especially those in developing countries. It’s a hard truth and it really sucks.
Now, some good news – womxn are incredible! In fact, womxn are one of the best resources we have in the war against climate change. So without further ado, here are five womxn from around the world who are showing us how it’s done.

1. Esethu Cenga

South Africa

While working on her Masters thesis in Economic Development at the University of Cape Town, Esethu Cenga met a man in India who recycles textiles to make new clothing. Soon after, she co-founded Rewoven, a company that creates 100% recycled, quality fabric using textile waste that would otherwise go to landfill.

In simplest terms, Rewoven collects, cleans and colour separates used clothing (no dye necessary – genius!), then shreds, re-spins and re-weaves into new fabric. Now that's how you do fashion-forward.

I fundamentally believe that the human species cannot ensure its survival and development without adopting sustainable practises that account for not just profit, but also for people, planet and general wellbeing. – Esethu Cenga

2. Vanessa Nakate

Uganda

Vanessa Nakate is a climate campaigner giving voice to underrepresented BIPOC climate activists to create a more inclusive conversation. She explains it best herself:

It’s important for African activists to be listened to, to be heard, because they have stories to tell, they have suffering and pain as victims of the climate crisis that they need to tell the world about. – Vanessa Nakate

Vanessa started the Congo Rainforest strike to help protect the second-largest rainforest in the world which is sadly shrinking at an alarming rate. She’s the founder of A Million Activist Stories, and she’s leading the call for young Africans to get their leaders to treat climate change as the emergency it is.

3. Gunhild Stordalen

Norway

Gunhild Stordalen is one of those womxn who does it all and does it well. The best kind of overachiever, she’s a medical doctor, environmentalist, philanthropist, former model, co-founder of the Stordalen Foundation which supports health, environmental and climate challenges; and Founder and Executive Chair of the EAT initiative. (Phew, quite a mouthful.)

As part of EAT, the EAT-Lancet Commission brought together world-leading scientists from across the globe to answer one extremely important question: can we feed a future population of 10 billion people a healthy diet within planetary boundaries? Their research is set to transform the way we consume food.

Fixing food is at the core of ‘building back better’ – a healthy, resilient, sustainable and equitable world. – Gunhild Stordalen

4. Ridhima Pandey

India

There are many incredible young womxn who, along with the likes of Greta Thunberg, are acting early to try and protect the future of the planet. In India, 12-year-old Ridhima Pandey noticed that her hometown was getting hotter and drier each year.

She’s since done significant work to push the Indian Government to get active against climate change, address decreasing water resources, and the resulting impact on the health of the population. She also joined 15 other child petitioners to challenge France, Germany, Brazil, Argentina and Turkey to tackle the climate crisis, because not doing so would be a violation of child rights.

I want to save my future. I want to save our future. I want to save the future of all the children and all people of future generations. – Ridhima Pandey

5. Yola Mgogwana

South Africa

Like the previous mention on the list, Yola Mgogwana didn’t let her young age stop her from making a big impact. Yola is part of Earthchild Project and at just 11 years old, she led the 2019 climate change strike of over 2000 children outside South African parliament.

The crisis is now! People are dying! Nature is crying for help... hear us! – Yola Mgogwana

When she isn’t protesting, she’s advocating for her community in Khayelitsha to take better care of the environment, stop littering and stop using single-use plastics.

These are just five of many many awesome womxn who are putting in the work to help save our planet. Follow them, support them, and be like them.

Let’s get the bad news out of the way – climate change is very much real and happening, and it’s disproportionately affecting womxn – especially those in developing countries. It’s a hard truth and it really sucks.
Now, some good news – womxn are incredible! In fact, womxn are one of the best resources we have in the war against climate change. So without further ado, here are five womxn from around the world who are showing us how it’s done.

1. Esethu Cenga

South Africa

While working on her Masters thesis in Economic Development at the University of Cape Town, Esethu Cenga met a man in India who recycles textiles to make new clothing. Soon after, she co-founded Rewoven, a company that creates 100% recycled, quality fabric using textile waste that would otherwise go to landfill.

In simplest terms, Rewoven collects, cleans and colour separates used clothing (no dye necessary – genius!), then shreds, re-spins and re-weaves into new fabric. Now that's how you do fashion-forward.

I fundamentally believe that the human species cannot ensure its survival and development without adopting sustainable practises that account for not just profit, but also for people, planet and general wellbeing. – Esethu Cenga

2. Vanessa Nakate

Uganda

Vanessa Nakate is a climate campaigner giving voice to underrepresented BIPOC climate activists to create a more inclusive conversation. She explains it best herself:

It’s important for African activists to be listened to, to be heard, because they have stories to tell, they have suffering and pain as victims of the climate crisis that they need to tell the world about. – Vanessa Nakate

Vanessa started the Congo Rainforest strike to help protect the second-largest rainforest in the world which is sadly shrinking at an alarming rate. She’s the founder of A Million Activist Stories, and she’s leading the call for young Africans to get their leaders to treat climate change as the emergency it is.

3. Gunhild Stordalen

Norway

Gunhild Stordalen is one of those womxn who does it all and does it well. The best kind of overachiever, she’s a medical doctor, environmentalist, philanthropist, former model, co-founder of the Stordalen Foundation which supports health, environmental and climate challenges; and Founder and Executive Chair of the EAT initiative. (Phew, quite a mouthful.)

As part of EAT, the EAT-Lancet Commission brought together world-leading scientists from across the globe to answer one extremely important question: can we feed a future population of 10 billion people a healthy diet within planetary boundaries? Their research is set to transform the way we consume food.

Fixing food is at the core of ‘building back better’ – a healthy, resilient, sustainable and equitable world. – Gunhild Stordalen

4. Ridhima Pandey

India

There are many incredible young womxn who, along with the likes of Greta Thunberg, are acting early to try and protect the future of the planet. In India, 12-year-old Ridhima Pandey noticed that her hometown was getting hotter and drier each year.

She’s since done significant work to push the Indian Government to get active against climate change, address decreasing water resources, and the resulting impact on the health of the population. She also joined 15 other child petitioners to challenge France, Germany, Brazil, Argentina and Turkey to tackle the climate crisis, because not doing so would be a violation of child rights.

I want to save my future. I want to save our future. I want to save the future of all the children and all people of future generations. – Ridhima Pandey

5. Yola Mgogwana

South Africa

Like the previous mention on the list, Yola Mgogwana didn’t let her young age stop her from making a big impact. Yola is part of Earthchild Project and at just 11 years old, she led the 2019 climate change strike of over 2000 children outside South African parliament.

The crisis is now! People are dying! Nature is crying for help... hear us! – Yola Mgogwana

When she isn’t protesting, she’s advocating for her community in Khayelitsha to take better care of the environment, stop littering and stop using single-use plastics.

These are just five of many many awesome womxn who are putting in the work to help save our planet. Follow them, support them, and be like them.

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