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Get your shopping fix without fast fashion

Get your shopping fix without fast fashion

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Gone are the days when secondhand shopping was only associated with sad bargain bins at your local charity shop.

Gone are the days when secondhand shopping was only associated with sad bargain bins at your local charity shop.

Get your shopping fix without fast fashion
Gone are the days when secondhand shopping was only associated with sad bargain bins at your local charity shop. The reality is that secondhand shopping is part of a resale industry that’s set to become an essential part of how we shop in the future.

More and more consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the devastating effects of fast fashion, that is inexpensive clothing produced by mass-market retailers according to the latest trends. This awareness has resulted in the secondhand clothing industry growing even faster than the sale of new clothing. According to Business of Fashion, the secondhand industry will be worth $32 billion in 2020. Not bad for “some old grandma dresses”. Thanks to online shopping, buying secondhand can now be as easy, quick and reliable as fast fashion, with the added benefit of offering one of a kind items, quality fabrics and often even better prices.

In Norway (and world-wide) one can see a growing community of secondhand stores that are selling items online, via apps and on Instagram. No matter your style, once you get the hang of browsing, you’ll be able to find items that fit right into your wardrobe and satisfy that itch for something ‘new’. 

Know your measurements

The thing that puts most people off secondhand shopping online is the risk that the item will not fit. Knowing your bust, waist and hip measurements will give you a rather accurate idea of how something will fit, as most websites and accounts provide the measurements for an item either by request or in the caption.

Clothes swap or resell

In the cases where an item doesn’t have the right fit or isn’t what you expected, swap it or resell to friends.

DIY (or find a good tailor)

Secondhand items are often one of a kind, you could find the jeans that are the perfect wash of blue, but a size too big or too broad, or a skirt in the print of your dreams but it’s too long.

Secondhand items can be transformed with a little reworking – take in the leg of those jeans, take up the hem of the skirt, turn baggy shirts into crop tops, or pants into shorts. It is a great DIY project and one can find a number of tutorials online. If needed ask for help from friends or family. A reliable tailor can also do wonders.

If you are looking for inspiration for what to do with fabric you have available, have a look at the sewing patterns at www.faebrik.no (@jointhefaebrik on Instagram. The website allows you to buy patterns that enable you to transform your old clothes to baby clothes, or your grandmother’s tablecloth to a summer dress.

Save on delivery costs

The one downside of online shopping is the cost and waste involved in the delivery. Try to save on delivery by buying a few items at the time or shop together with a friend. This also means less plastic packaging in the long run. Some websites also allow collections so you can pick your package up yourself if you’re in the same area.

Save your search and turn on post notifications

This isn’t just a phrase from the influencers. Turning on post notifications from your favourite online shops might actually allow you to get some really great deals.

Some of my favourite secondhand online stores:

Clothing rental subscription at Fjong (@fjong.co on Instagram)

Why buy if you can rent and have more options at a lower cost? Fjong now offers different subscription plans and you decide how long you want to keep the items. Delivery and cleaning are included in the monthly price. Both private individuals, designers and brands can lend out clothes through Fjong. If you have items you think people would like to rent, you might also be able to add it to the website.

Find your unique t-shirts at Velouria Vintage (@velouriavintage on Instagram)

The shop has long been a great place to shop vintage in Oslo. They now they have an online shop where you can find really cool t-shirts, jackets, skirts and more. Follow them on Instagram for some great vintage inspiration.

Shop sustainable while supporting a great cause at Fretex (@fretexnettbutikk on Instagram)

Shop sustainable while supporting a great cause. The online shop is frequently updated and offer a wide range of clothing (and more). Search according to the brand, colour, size or material you are looking for.

Buy or sell at Finn.no

Now a classic. Remember to save your search if you are looking for anything in particular. The website also offers the potential for you to sell items you no longer use. This way you can feel even better when you buy new (secondhand) items.

Buy (or sell) using the app Tise (@tise on Instagram)

A great app for those who are looking for something unique while shopping sustainable. Scroll through a high volume of secondhand items or sell whatever items you no longer need.

Gone are the days when secondhand shopping was only associated with sad bargain bins at your local charity shop. The reality is that secondhand shopping is part of a resale industry that’s set to become an essential part of how we shop in the future.

More and more consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the devastating effects of fast fashion, that is inexpensive clothing produced by mass-market retailers according to the latest trends. This awareness has resulted in the secondhand clothing industry growing even faster than the sale of new clothing. According to Business of Fashion, the secondhand industry will be worth $32 billion in 2020. Not bad for “some old grandma dresses”. Thanks to online shopping, buying secondhand can now be as easy, quick and reliable as fast fashion, with the added benefit of offering one of a kind items, quality fabrics and often even better prices.

In Norway (and world-wide) one can see a growing community of secondhand stores that are selling items online, via apps and on Instagram. No matter your style, once you get the hang of browsing, you’ll be able to find items that fit right into your wardrobe and satisfy that itch for something ‘new’. 

Know your measurements

The thing that puts most people off secondhand shopping online is the risk that the item will not fit. Knowing your bust, waist and hip measurements will give you a rather accurate idea of how something will fit, as most websites and accounts provide the measurements for an item either by request or in the caption.

Clothes swap or resell

In the cases where an item doesn’t have the right fit or isn’t what you expected, swap it or resell to friends.

DIY (or find a good tailor)

Secondhand items are often one of a kind, you could find the jeans that are the perfect wash of blue, but a size too big or too broad, or a skirt in the print of your dreams but it’s too long.

Secondhand items can be transformed with a little reworking – take in the leg of those jeans, take up the hem of the skirt, turn baggy shirts into crop tops, or pants into shorts. It is a great DIY project and one can find a number of tutorials online. If needed ask for help from friends or family. A reliable tailor can also do wonders.

If you are looking for inspiration for what to do with fabric you have available, have a look at the sewing patterns at www.faebrik.no (@jointhefaebrik on Instagram. The website allows you to buy patterns that enable you to transform your old clothes to baby clothes, or your grandmother’s tablecloth to a summer dress.

Save on delivery costs

The one downside of online shopping is the cost and waste involved in the delivery. Try to save on delivery by buying a few items at the time or shop together with a friend. This also means less plastic packaging in the long run. Some websites also allow collections so you can pick your package up yourself if you’re in the same area.

Save your search and turn on post notifications

This isn’t just a phrase from the influencers. Turning on post notifications from your favourite online shops might actually allow you to get some really great deals.

Some of my favourite secondhand online stores:

Clothing rental subscription at Fjong (@fjong.co on Instagram)

Why buy if you can rent and have more options at a lower cost? Fjong now offers different subscription plans and you decide how long you want to keep the items. Delivery and cleaning are included in the monthly price. Both private individuals, designers and brands can lend out clothes through Fjong. If you have items you think people would like to rent, you might also be able to add it to the website.

Find your unique t-shirts at Velouria Vintage (@velouriavintage on Instagram)

The shop has long been a great place to shop vintage in Oslo. They now they have an online shop where you can find really cool t-shirts, jackets, skirts and more. Follow them on Instagram for some great vintage inspiration.

Shop sustainable while supporting a great cause at Fretex (@fretexnettbutikk on Instagram)

Shop sustainable while supporting a great cause. The online shop is frequently updated and offer a wide range of clothing (and more). Search according to the brand, colour, size or material you are looking for.

Buy or sell at Finn.no

Now a classic. Remember to save your search if you are looking for anything in particular. The website also offers the potential for you to sell items you no longer use. This way you can feel even better when you buy new (secondhand) items.

Buy (or sell) using the app Tise (@tise on Instagram)

A great app for those who are looking for something unique while shopping sustainable. Scroll through a high volume of secondhand items or sell whatever items you no longer need.

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