Eating

How to feed a vegan on Christmas

How to feed a vegan on Christmas

Wave line SVG.

Step 1: Don’t panic.

Step 1: Don’t panic.

How to feed a vegan on Christmas

Step 1: Don’t panic

People with dietary restrictions of any kind are used to being people with dietary restrictions. They know to do a bit of research before they eat at a restaurant and to contact the host in advance of events. They’re fully aware that people will be nervous of hosting them and they’ll likely offer to help or bring a dish, or at the very least, arrive with a stash of trail mix in their pocket.

Step 2: Manage your own expectations

You might think you need to make a huge elaborate tofurky or watermelon “ham”, but chances are your guest isn’t expecting that. They might even be embarrassed if you make a huge meal just for them. As a vegetarian, every now and then people cater especially for me and it’s always a stuffed butternut and while they’re delicious the first 150 times you eat them, I don’t think I could ever eat another stuffed butternut again in my life.

I’m much happier eating the potato bake and side salad and knowing I didn’t add extra stress or work to my host’s day.

Step 3: Plan your menu

Then step back and have a look at it. There are likely a few dishes or sides that are either already vegan or could be tweaked relatively easily. For example, any veggie side dish that usually contains butter or cream can be prepared with vegan margarine or coconut oil (looking at you, mashed potatoes). Salads can have cheese or dairy-based dressings on the side. Carrots with honey could easily be made with maple syrup.

Step 4: Ask for help

Instead of worrying, reach out to your vegan friend or family member and ask for advice. Perhaps they can bring a large vegan dish for the table, or maybe they’d like to prepare a small vegan version of whatever you’re making for the main course, so they feel like they fit in. Or they can suggest some of their favourite recipes for you to try.

Step 5: Use the opportunity to explore new recipes

Speaking of recipes, you might have a signature broccoli and bacon dish, but maybe this is the year you try something new. I love this vegan broccoli salad filled with rich flavours. There are so many delicious new meals out there, ready to be tested and tasted.

Step 6: Make “build your own” meals

Like leaving your salad dressing on the side, but on a larger scale, try cooking some elements of your meal separately. Instead of meat, veggies and potatoes all going on one oven tray, cook potatoes and veggies separately with olive oil, so anyone avoiding meat can still enjoy those options. Is your stuffing vegan-friendly? Then cook and serve it in a separate dish.

Step 7: Cheat

If all of the advice thus far sounds like a lot of work, I hear you. Try looking into readymade vegan options at your local market or grocery store. Bonus points if it’s a freezer-to-oven special you can buy, freeze and forget about until the big day. I say “cheat”, but it’s not really cheating.

Nobody expects you to be superhuman and make everything from scratch. If store-bought is good enough for Ina Garten, it’s good enough for your guests.

Lastly, don’t forget to enjoy yourself. We all know the Christmas cliché, while meals and gifts are lovely, the best part is to being together and taking time to relax. Try not to let all the planning take that away from you.

Step 1: Don’t panic

People with dietary restrictions of any kind are used to being people with dietary restrictions. They know to do a bit of research before they eat at a restaurant and to contact the host in advance of events. They’re fully aware that people will be nervous of hosting them and they’ll likely offer to help or bring a dish, or at the very least, arrive with a stash of trail mix in their pocket.

Step 2: Manage your own expectations

You might think you need to make a huge elaborate tofurky or watermelon “ham”, but chances are your guest isn’t expecting that. They might even be embarrassed if you make a huge meal just for them. As a vegetarian, every now and then people cater especially for me and it’s always a stuffed butternut and while they’re delicious the first 150 times you eat them, I don’t think I could ever eat another stuffed butternut again in my life.

I’m much happier eating the potato bake and side salad and knowing I didn’t add extra stress or work to my host’s day.

Step 3: Plan your menu

Then step back and have a look at it. There are likely a few dishes or sides that are either already vegan or could be tweaked relatively easily. For example, any veggie side dish that usually contains butter or cream can be prepared with vegan margarine or coconut oil (looking at you, mashed potatoes). Salads can have cheese or dairy-based dressings on the side. Carrots with honey could easily be made with maple syrup.

Step 4: Ask for help

Instead of worrying, reach out to your vegan friend or family member and ask for advice. Perhaps they can bring a large vegan dish for the table, or maybe they’d like to prepare a small vegan version of whatever you’re making for the main course, so they feel like they fit in. Or they can suggest some of their favourite recipes for you to try.

Step 5: Use the opportunity to explore new recipes

Speaking of recipes, you might have a signature broccoli and bacon dish, but maybe this is the year you try something new. I love this vegan broccoli salad filled with rich flavours. There are so many delicious new meals out there, ready to be tested and tasted.

Step 6: Make “build your own” meals

Like leaving your salad dressing on the side, but on a larger scale, try cooking some elements of your meal separately. Instead of meat, veggies and potatoes all going on one oven tray, cook potatoes and veggies separately with olive oil, so anyone avoiding meat can still enjoy those options. Is your stuffing vegan-friendly? Then cook and serve it in a separate dish.

Step 7: Cheat

If all of the advice thus far sounds like a lot of work, I hear you. Try looking into readymade vegan options at your local market or grocery store. Bonus points if it’s a freezer-to-oven special you can buy, freeze and forget about until the big day. I say “cheat”, but it’s not really cheating.

Nobody expects you to be superhuman and make everything from scratch. If store-bought is good enough for Ina Garten, it’s good enough for your guests.

Lastly, don’t forget to enjoy yourself. We all know the Christmas cliché, while meals and gifts are lovely, the best part is to being together and taking time to relax. Try not to let all the planning take that away from you.

More like this

关于更多

No items found.