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Meet the team from Mungo

Meet the team from Mungo

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Learn more about Mungo, a homeware textile company based in South Africa on a mission to create heirloom-quality woven goods with integrity.

Learn more about Mungo, a homeware textile company based in South Africa on a mission to create heirloom-quality woven goods with integrity.

Meet the team from Mungo
"There is no denying the significant consumer attitude shift towards being more conscious of purchasing decisions in light of the current climate crisis our planet is facing. The importance of purchasing from ‘sustainable' manufacturers permeates the consumer mindset in virtually every market. But defining sustainability is challenging because it is more than just a word, it’s a multi-faceted concept that can mean different things depending on it’s context.
In its true sense, sustainability simply means something has the capacity to endure. I hesitate to use the term ’sustainability’ because it is all too often used as a vacuous buzzword that businesses are stamping all over their marketing material to indicate that their values align with the 21st centuries need for environmental protection. I think as manufacturers we need to be more conscious of explaining our sustainable approaches - not just using the word and a blanket signifier." – Dax Holding, MD at Mungo a homeware textile company based in South Africa on a mission to create heirloom-quality woven goods with integrity in an open and transparent manner.

1. Tell us about yourself.

My name is Dax Holding (pictured above, middle). I’m 41 years old. I have a 4-year-old daughter. I love to surf. I have no formal education but have lived my life around entrepreneurs. I have diverse work experience. In my 20’s I trained as a cabinet maker and ran my own workshop, this is where I came to understand manufacturing and the value of quality. Later I worked in event management and learned about the organisational requirements of running a large team and working to uncompromising deadlines. In my early 30’s I worked as a charter captain in the Caribbean, being responsible for the lives of families and learning to work with many different cultures.

I’m a rogue MD that wears flip flops most days and needs a haircut. A board meeting is convened to coincide with an approaching swell and the budget is constructed with a view to changing the way we operate as a business.

2. What does a day in your life look like?

There is no such thing as a typical day. Sorry. But generally, during the week I awake at 6. Put the coffee on. I try to meditate as much as possible. I deliberate over which pair of jeans to wear and whether it’s a shirt day or a t-shirt day. But I don’t really care. I pack my office into my bag and go to work. If I’m in Plettenberg Bay I typically arrive “late" for work at 8.15 and if I’m in Cape Town it’s generally “early”, around 8.45.

When my daughter is home (she lives with her mom in America most of the time) it is love and it's chaos and it's mayhem. Shout out to the single parents!

But either way, I try to get to the beach for a walk or a swim. Soothed by the water and the sound.

3. What did you learn from the textile exchange conference in Vancouver?

We have a huge task ahead of us to stop and then reverse the damage we have done to our planet. To effectively do this, we need to collaborate and communicate with each other. There are a lot of cynics and conversations that happen around criticism of what we do. If I recycle but drive a big car I’m a hypocrite. It’s important to maintain a positive shift in one's life to make a change in the way we consume and this is sometimes slow.

There's no magic wand, we have to be systematic and dogged and unrelenting in our efforts. There's no room for judgment and criticism. Just action. Do what you can and never stop trying to do more.

4. What made you decide to start a sustainable brand?

It’s always being sustainable. My parents started living low impact before it became mainstream. I inherited a philosophy and a business, it was built into me. Popular culture pushed me away from it. So my journey is a lot to do with personal development as well as evolving the current business model into something current and hopefully aspirational.

5. What do you find most challenging about living sustainably?

That I will never live without having a negative impact. I need to pick my battles because I can’t change everything. That I’m a walking contradiction every day.

6. What advice would you give to someone looking to live more sustainably?

Listen. Share. Do.

7. Which brands are doing it right?

There are a lot of companies doing some amazing things. I think we need to research who is doing something special in our local economy and support them as much as possible. The important things to look for are companies with good values that produce a product of good quality. But most importantly we need to shift our attitudes of consumption, it’s more than looking for companies that produce lower impact products. You can buy 6 pairs of organic cotton jeans a year or one of conventional. What has a lower impact?

8. What are some of your favourite sustainable brands?

Anyone who is working to solve the problem. I’m not much of a shopper. I buy my soap from a small manufacturer in Plett and try to clothe myself with locally produced clothing. Brands don’t really factor into my thinking. I love Patagonia.

9. What's your advice for someone wanting to start a sustainable brand?

Do it for the right reasons. Don’t do it because it is a trend. Reflect constantly on what it is you are doing. Never stop considering how you can improve. Accept that what you are doing isn’t always perfect. Don’t let the haters get you down.

Good Luck! Call me, let's chat.

"There is no denying the significant consumer attitude shift towards being more conscious of purchasing decisions in light of the current climate crisis our planet is facing. The importance of purchasing from ‘sustainable' manufacturers permeates the consumer mindset in virtually every market. But defining sustainability is challenging because it is more than just a word, it’s a multi-faceted concept that can mean different things depending on it’s context.
In its true sense, sustainability simply means something has the capacity to endure. I hesitate to use the term ’sustainability’ because it is all too often used as a vacuous buzzword that businesses are stamping all over their marketing material to indicate that their values align with the 21st centuries need for environmental protection. I think as manufacturers we need to be more conscious of explaining our sustainable approaches - not just using the word and a blanket signifier." – Dax Holding, MD at Mungo a homeware textile company based in South Africa on a mission to create heirloom-quality woven goods with integrity in an open and transparent manner.

1. Tell us about yourself.

My name is Dax Holding (pictured above, middle). I’m 41 years old. I have a 4-year-old daughter. I love to surf. I have no formal education but have lived my life around entrepreneurs. I have diverse work experience. In my 20’s I trained as a cabinet maker and ran my own workshop, this is where I came to understand manufacturing and the value of quality. Later I worked in event management and learned about the organisational requirements of running a large team and working to uncompromising deadlines. In my early 30’s I worked as a charter captain in the Caribbean, being responsible for the lives of families and learning to work with many different cultures.

I’m a rogue MD that wears flip flops most days and needs a haircut. A board meeting is convened to coincide with an approaching swell and the budget is constructed with a view to changing the way we operate as a business.

2. What does a day in your life look like?

There is no such thing as a typical day. Sorry. But generally, during the week I awake at 6. Put the coffee on. I try to meditate as much as possible. I deliberate over which pair of jeans to wear and whether it’s a shirt day or a t-shirt day. But I don’t really care. I pack my office into my bag and go to work. If I’m in Plettenberg Bay I typically arrive “late" for work at 8.15 and if I’m in Cape Town it’s generally “early”, around 8.45.

When my daughter is home (she lives with her mom in America most of the time) it is love and it's chaos and it's mayhem. Shout out to the single parents!

But either way, I try to get to the beach for a walk or a swim. Soothed by the water and the sound.

3. What did you learn from the textile exchange conference in Vancouver?

We have a huge task ahead of us to stop and then reverse the damage we have done to our planet. To effectively do this, we need to collaborate and communicate with each other. There are a lot of cynics and conversations that happen around criticism of what we do. If I recycle but drive a big car I’m a hypocrite. It’s important to maintain a positive shift in one's life to make a change in the way we consume and this is sometimes slow.

There's no magic wand, we have to be systematic and dogged and unrelenting in our efforts. There's no room for judgment and criticism. Just action. Do what you can and never stop trying to do more.

4. What made you decide to start a sustainable brand?

It’s always being sustainable. My parents started living low impact before it became mainstream. I inherited a philosophy and a business, it was built into me. Popular culture pushed me away from it. So my journey is a lot to do with personal development as well as evolving the current business model into something current and hopefully aspirational.

5. What do you find most challenging about living sustainably?

That I will never live without having a negative impact. I need to pick my battles because I can’t change everything. That I’m a walking contradiction every day.

6. What advice would you give to someone looking to live more sustainably?

Listen. Share. Do.

7. Which brands are doing it right?

There are a lot of companies doing some amazing things. I think we need to research who is doing something special in our local economy and support them as much as possible. The important things to look for are companies with good values that produce a product of good quality. But most importantly we need to shift our attitudes of consumption, it’s more than looking for companies that produce lower impact products. You can buy 6 pairs of organic cotton jeans a year or one of conventional. What has a lower impact?

8. What are some of your favourite sustainable brands?

Anyone who is working to solve the problem. I’m not much of a shopper. I buy my soap from a small manufacturer in Plett and try to clothe myself with locally produced clothing. Brands don’t really factor into my thinking. I love Patagonia.

9. What's your advice for someone wanting to start a sustainable brand?

Do it for the right reasons. Don’t do it because it is a trend. Reflect constantly on what it is you are doing. Never stop considering how you can improve. Accept that what you are doing isn’t always perfect. Don’t let the haters get you down.

Good Luck! Call me, let's chat.

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